trip to london

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trip to london

Postby Christoph K » Thu Jul 09, 2015 11:10 am

Since i plan to visit london for a week in juli i'd like to ask if there is something ironbrush related that i definitely should not miss? Maybe something even google don't know ;-)
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Re: trip to london

Postby Sage » Sat Jul 11, 2015 8:18 pm

The V&A is worth a visit - they have a fair bit of Japanese work in their collection including many tsuba and netsuke.

I also enjoyed a visit to Malcolm Fairley's shop: http://www.malcolmfairley.com
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Re: trip to london

Postby jhobson » Sun Jul 12, 2015 8:22 am

V&A presentation is disappointing for me - too dark and distant. ( Especially after seeing what can be achieved in the NY Metropolitan.) But even so, it is absolutely the top pick of places to visit in London.
They only have a small portion of the collection on display. They do let people see behind the scenes, especially if you are researching a project, want to see specific pieces, and ask nicely ... well in advance.

Check for special exhibitions at the British Museum for when you visit.
Chiddingstone castle has some Japanese stuff. I went many years ago but the display then was very poor e.g. all swords in scabbards. They have special Japanese events.
http://www.chiddingstonecastle.org.uk/t ... ollection/


Get a gallery scope: http://www.opticron.co.uk/Pages/gallery_scope.htm. It is the only way to see detail in a museum.
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Re: trip to london

Postby Ford » Sun Jul 12, 2015 12:03 pm

The V&A Japanese galleries may shortly be closed for a refit to launch in November...with a tsuba by "you know who" and a little film showing how it was made as part of the permanent display. :cheerleader:

The Wallace Collection museum is excellent.

The British Museum has a fair collection on display but it does rotate.

Don Bayney is the only sword and tsuba dealer in London. He's in the Grey's Mews antique market on Davies street He's a good chap and quite welcoming.
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Re: trip to london

Postby Christoph K » Mon Jul 13, 2015 9:39 am

Obviously london is a very interesting place in this case too.
Thank you for your suggestions :-)
(I think i'll have to lock my credit card while visiting Don Bayney ;-))
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Re: trip to london

Postby jhobson » Sat Nov 28, 2015 10:43 am

jhobson wrote:V&A presentation is disappointing for me - too dark and distant.

I went to see Ford's video and tsuba's yesterday. The new layout does let you get closer and there are more on display in a single cabinet so you can stand in one place for an hour and not get bored.
However, the lighting is still terrible. I went with a gallery scope and could not see the detail I hoping for. I couldn't really even appreciate Ford's display despite being inches from that. You should probably take a torch, but I don't know how that would go down.
Two sword blades on display in same cabinet. One was lit OK, the other (with the more active hamon) was too difficult to scruitenise.
I know they are worried about the impact of light over time and they have some sensitive pictures and fabric, but couldn't they adjust levels according to the susceptibility of the subject and maybe move the organics to one side (sword blade is currently displayed with rest of mounts)?
The policy is followed throughout most of the museum. I'm also interested in other swords but once again the lighting usually means any detail in the blade is too difficult to see if your eyesight is aging like mine.

I visited the plaster room with the full-size David for the first time - in these rooms you get natural light from the top. wow.
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