Basic tsuba project No:1

Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Ford » Wed Aug 26, 2009 9:29 am

A very basic tsuba project with the emphasis on marking out, clean piercing and accurate file work.

The Basic tsuba project No1 is in fact offered as a basic introduction to the work so that people we don't know can demonstrate they are serious and also to gain a little experience before jumping into the "academy" where things are far more uncompromising. There the critiques tell it straight and our expectations are very high. This is part of the reason it's no longer open to the public. It's not right for those who are subjecting themselves to those demands to be public entertainment for the mildly curious.

Ok chaps I reckon this Classic Owari guard is straightforward enough. It's practically a mechanical drawing :biggrin:

image0-10.jpg


measurements; 70.5mm perfect circle...rim is 4.8mm and the seppa dai is 4.5...so bugger all difference ;) ..that could be pushed a little....maybe :sneaky:
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Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Lorenzo » Wed Aug 26, 2009 10:18 am

Here is the template of the mechanical aspect.

Owari.pdf
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hitsu ana has some subtle aspects that could be lost in a cad drawings.. while perhaps to leave it to the maker interpretation can lead to interesting effects or differences... what you think?

I did seppadai 42 mm (in scale with the picture..) and in center of the piece.
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Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Ford » Wed Aug 26, 2009 11:01 am

Thanks Lorenzo. It does seem very mechanical and stiff so I think the task must also for the guys to try to interpret the real form of the tsuba as seen in the photo. As you say; the hitsu-ana are quite subtle forms, as is the seppadai.

You can use the CAD plan as a reference but must then soften inner corners and make the other adjustments as you see them on the photo.

Thanks again.
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Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Patrick Hastings » Thu Aug 27, 2009 8:27 am

Here's a printable template... Save for the outer most line and the core holes it tracks the shape of the original closely. Frankly, I observed some things I had not noticed before while making the study...so examine this carefully :think:

owaritemplate1.pdf
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Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Ford » Tue Sep 01, 2009 7:55 am

Thanks Chaps...I think that's all the information needed to recreate the tsuba.

I must stress that although Patrick and Lorenzo have helpfully provided technical plans for guidance the essential marking out must be done with a compass, scriber and ruler....and I'll know if it wasn't :naughty:

I would also strongly recommend making a thin metal template (I generally use .5mm thick copper or brass sheet. Brass is probably better) of the seppa-dai with the nakago-ana also cut out. This will be reused on subsequent tsuba projects so it's worth doing it well. You'll find a good model in the pdf Patrick created for you. :thumbsup: It's very helpful to have those vertical and horizontal lines marked in clearly before any cutting and filing is done. It makes it much easier to place on the tsuba and they act as a good guide when you actually shape up the template.

Good luck all....and please don't hesitate to ask for further advice or guidance if you feel it may help.

Namaste,

Ford 8)
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Re: Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Julio » Sun Sep 06, 2009 11:28 am

Ford, is it ok if the exercise is made in Copper plate? I have two blanks of steel that Mark kindly sent my way which I would rather keep for other projects when the time comes.

Of course, I should really locate a local scrapyard and try and find some more steel.
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Re: Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Ford » Sun Sep 06, 2009 1:01 pm

Use whatever you have available Hyllyn. :thumbsup:
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Re: Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Julio » Sun Sep 06, 2009 1:34 pm

Cool bananas.

By the way when I said other projects I was referring to the tsubashi online academy ones. Just in case. ;)
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Re: Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Ford » Sun Sep 06, 2009 3:09 pm

Well, when we get further down the line and you chaps are all ready to submit work to the NBTHK shinsaku competitions we may be able to persuade Pierre (Nadeau) to make some blanks for you from tamahagane. For a modest price of course ;)
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Re: Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Julio » Mon Sep 07, 2009 1:45 am

Ford wrote:Well, when we get further down the line and you chaps are all ready to submit work to the NBTHK shinsaku competitions we may be able to persuade Pierre (Nadeau) to make some blanks for you from tamahagane. For a modest price of course ;)


That's certainly something worth aspiring to if it is within the possibilities in the future (both being able to submit work and persuading Pierre) :pray: :thumbsup:
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Re: Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Niels Provos » Wed Oct 21, 2009 4:21 am

Alright. I am having some problems with this. I have a bunch of 5in x 5in x 5mm steel plates. The only way I can get permanent markings on them is with a carbite tipped scriber. So, I center punched the middle of the tsuba, attached the scriber via cable ties to the compass and was able to get the first circle scribed into the steel. Unfortunately, the pressure required to make the scriber leave a mark in the steel is changing the radius. It's driving me nuts. I was thinking of making a stencil with a softer metal - but don't have anything liking around. Permanent marker or pencil rubs off immediately from the steel. Any suggestions? I hope these questions are not too dumb :-)

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Re: Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Patrick Hastings » Wed Oct 21, 2009 5:01 am

If your steel is that hard to scribe it might be almost impossible to cut as prescribed.
Do you know what kind of steel it is or where it came from. It might be possible to anneal it to make it workable again. Otherwise I would suggest getting some mild steel than can be worked more easily...
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Re: Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Niels Provos » Wed Oct 21, 2009 5:16 am

I don't know what steel it is. I strongly suspect it is mild steel, A36 or some such. After some more thought on this, the problem might be due to the divider. It's spring tensioned and the pressure to mark the steel is higher than the spring tension. I will search for a different compass. Sorry for the noise.

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Re: Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby Mark Green » Wed Oct 21, 2009 8:04 pm

Niels,

I'm with patrick. If you are having that much trouble making a scratch in your steel, just think what sawing it will be like.
I would test the edge with one of your saw blades.
This project takes quite a bit of saw work. I feel the idea, is for you to learn what it takes to make some basic cuts, while following the nice design. Cutting steel of any thickness is not easy. Anything over 3mm is a bugger. Anything over 5mm is just 'worst'.
Go to the scrapyard and find some nice mild steel. It will cut like butter, and the frustration level will not be making you pull your hair out.
Just an idea ;)
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Re: Basic tsuba project No:1

Postby jhobson » Sat Jan 01, 2011 7:09 pm

I've got far enough with the project to ask some questions. I'll try and limit them as I could probably go on all night.

seppa-dai
Should the surface be flat front and back like all the other tsuba's I see? I guess to ensure appropriate fitting when mounted with sword? Mine is wrought iron forged flat from bar and currently has a nice pattern from the forge (combination of etching by borax when trying to close up splits, and forge scale flaked off) but is probably bad practice even if I do like it (show and tell). Does that mean I have a lot of work to do?

Nakago ana
I made mine to closely fit my sword all round. Looking at all other tsubas, I'm guessing it should be bigger and should only contact the blade in 3 points - 2 top and 1 bottom. Is there some explanation of how the tsuba should be made to fit the sword?
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